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Elicit vs. Illicit

Elicit is a verb and means to get information or to succeed in getting a reaction from someone.

  • The Prosecutor was trying to elicit a response from him.
  • When her knock elicited no response, she opened the door and looked inside.

Libertad tip – try replacing the word elicit with the word ‘obtain’, to check.

 Illicit is an adjective that means not permitted by law, or strongly disapproved of by society.

  • The teacher found illicit drugs in their rucksacks.
  • Their illicit behaviour got the students expelled from school.

Libertad tip – try the word ‘illegal for illicit to see if it fits.

Never get confused again, try these Libertad practice questions:

  1. It is difficult to ………………….. (elicit/illicit) sympathy for someone involved in shady financial dealings.
  2. Some images will ………………… (elicit/illicit) strong responses from the brain.
  3. There is an ………………….. (elicit/illicit) thrill in spying on your neighbours.
  4. The police officer sought to …………….. (elicit/illicit) a description of the attacker from the victim.
  5. Jack has been unable to ………………….. (elicit/illicit) funding for the animal rescue centre.
  6. It is an …………….. (elicit/illicit) love affair.

On a scale of 1 to 10 how easy did you find the questions above, with 1 being so easy? Let us know in the comments.

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